Gluten Free

Miessence has over 100 products and a few of them have gluten

'Gluten-Free' is an unverified claim on a skin care product and there are no standards for it, making it hard to make a claim that a skin and body care product is Gluten-Free.

Gluten is not absorbed by the skin.

I know there are people that are very sensitive to gluten, so I created this page as an informational page.

  • Organic production requires a total clean-down of all equipment between every batch. All the equipment must be completely cleaned between each batch because of this, there should be no issue with cross contamination in the manufacturing of Miessence products.
The following products contain soy and/or gluten:

The following products contain oats (and a slight possibility of 
gluten due to cross contamination. Cross-contamination of the oats can and does occur, most likely during processing of the grains... this would be in the processing of the grain before it is used in the Miessence plant - so the cross contamination is to the oats before it is used in manufacturing Miessence products thereby creating the possibilty of gluten being in any Miessence products that conatin oat kernal flour.)

• The Reflect Outdoor Balm contains Oat kernal flour - this is our "sunscreen"
Barrier Balm contains oat kernal flour

Miessence Concealers contains oat kernal flour 

 

the rest of the Miessence products do not contain gluten.

 

At this time, there is only one certification for 'gluten free'

http://glutenfreecooking.about.com/od/resources/a/wholefoods.htm

as it turns out there is actually no way to verify completely that a product is gluten free

"The FDA Role in Gluten Free Labeling"

After three years of deliberating on how and when to rule on a definition for the term "gluten-free" for voluntary use in food labeling, in August, 2008, the FDA failed to meet its' announced date for a ruling on proposed gluten free labeling.

Currently there is no technology available to detect gluten in foods to a level of zero. According to the FDA, 20 ppm is the proposed limit for allowable levels of gluten in products labeled gluten free based on " available analytic methods." "Data from peer-reviewed scientific literature demonstrate that current analytic technology can reliably and consistently detect gluten in wheat, rye, and barley at levels of 20 ppm in a variety of food matrices."

http://www.celiac.com/articles/937/1/Gluten-Free-Food-Certification-Program-by-the-Gluten-Intolerance-Group/Page1.html

 

here is the page for the certification program...
http://www.gfco.org/

Gluten Free labeling is directed toward food, the only certification program I could find is for food, not for personal care products.
If you are buying personal care products that are labeled "gluten free", you are doing this based on what the company is saying, which is actually no different than me telling you that most of the Miessence products are gluten free.

Any company claiming gluten free skincare is cashing in on an irrelevant claim, which is one of the seven sins of greenwashing

 

Dr. Mercola also addresses this issue on his website here.